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Tracing Activity of Cancer-Fighting Tomato Component

(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Years of research in University of Illinois scientist John Erdman's laboratory have demonstrated that lycopene, the bioactive red pigment found in tomatoes, reduces growth of prostate tumors in a variety of animal models. Until now, though, he did not have a way to trace lycopene's metabolism in the human body.
"Our team has learned to grow tomato plants in suspension culture that produce lycopene molecules with a heavier molecular weight. With this tool, we can trace lycopene's absorption, biodistribution, and metabolism in the body of healthy adults. In the future, we will be able to conduct such studies in men who have prostate cancer and gain important information about this plant component's anti-cancer activity," said John W. Erdman Jr., a U of I emeritus professor of nutrition.
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